Why Akathleptos?

Why Akathleptos? Because it means Uncontainable. God is infinite. Hence, the whole universe cannot contain Him. The term also refers to the incomprehensibility of God. No man can know everything about God. We can know Him personally but not exhaustively, not even in Heaven.

Why Patmos? Because the church is increasingly marginalized and exiled from the culture.

Why Pen-Names? So the focus is on the words and not who wrote them. We prefer to let what we say stand on its own merit. There is precedent in church history for this - i.e., the elusive identity of Ambrosiaster who wrote in the 4th century A.D.

“Truth is so obscured nowadays, and lies so well established, that unless we love the truth we shall never recognize it." Blaise Pascal



Saturday, October 8, 2016

New Archaeological Evidence Confirms Hezekiah Really Did Destroy Idols



A news report here details an archaeological discovery in Isreal that confirms Hezekiah really did destroy idols as reported in the OT. A new archaeological discovery in Israel reveals that the biblical King Hezekiah really did destroy pagan idols, consistent with the Bible’s account. CBN News reports that excavations in the Tel Lachish National Park in central Israel revealed a “gate-shrine,” dated to the period of the First Temple, about the eighth century B.C.

"The size of the gate is consistent with the historical and archaeological knowledge we possess, whereby Lachish was a major city and the most important one after Jerusalem," said excavation director Sa'ar Ganor.

The Bible contains accounts of King Hezekiah tearing down idols and desecrating the pagan temple, as well as fighting against Sennacherib, the Assyrian king. 2 Kings 18:4 says that King Hezekiah “removed the high places, smashed the sacred stones and cut down the Asherah poles.” The Bible says this took place at the city gates, and true to the biblical account, archaeologists found evidence of destruction of pagan artifacts near the city “gate-shrine.”

Besides cutting off the horns of the altar, apparently Hezekiah had a toilet installed in the "holy of holies" to further signify the abolition of worship and as the "ultimate desecration" of the place.

The "toilet" was a chair-shaped stone with a hole in the middle found in the corner of the room.  It was apparently symbolic, as tests showed it had never been used.

According to the IAA, archaeological research has identified stones like this as toilets. The idea of using a toilet to defile cultic locations is even mentioned in the Bible, as in the case of Jehu when he destroyed the cult of Ba'al (see II Kings 10:27). It's the first time the phenomenon has been confirmed archaeologically.

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