Why Akathleptos?

Why Akathleptos? Because it means Uncontainable. God is infinite. Hence, the whole universe cannot contain Him. The term also refers to the incomprehensibility of God. No man can know everything about God. We can know Him personally but not exhaustively, not even in Heaven.

Why Patmos? Because the church is increasingly marginalized and exiled from the culture.

Why Pen-Names? So the focus is on the words and not who wrote them. We prefer to let what we say stand on its own merit. There is precedent in church history for this - i.e., the elusive identity of Ambrosiaster who wrote in the 4th century A.D.

“Truth is so obscured nowadays, and lies so well established, that unless we love the truth we shall never recognize it." Blaise Pascal



Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Refusing To Capitulate to Unjust Civil Authority



Just as Daniel refused to capitulate to civil authority that wrongly sought to prohibit his prayer in Daniel 6:5-14, so a football coach correctly refuses to recognize the right of civil authority to restrict his right to prayer, no matter the consequences. More importantly, his example emboldens others. Hopefully this will be repeated time and again across a dying culture ...

A Washington football coach was surrounded by members of his football team, the opposing team and scores of supporters throughout his community on Friday as he knelt briefly to thank God at the conclusion of his school’s homecoming game.
As previously reported, Joe Kennedy, the assistant head coach for the varsity team at Bremerton High School and the head coach for the junior varsity team, had been prohibited by the district from allowing students to join him in his seven-year prayer practice, and planned to pray solo after last week’s game. But supporters wouldn’t have it.
“It’s ridiculous that he got in trouble at all,” Bremerton High School senior Cory Flournoy told the Seattle Times. “The students basically support the coach regardless of their religious beliefs.”
When Kennedy knelt down to pray at the 50-yard line at the conclusion of the homecoming game, he realized that he wasn’t alone.

“All of a sudden I feel all these bodies around me and I’m hoping they’re not kids,” he told reporters following the incident as he began to cry.
But it was—along with many others who had come off the bleachers to join him as he gave thanks to God.

“Lord, I thank you for these kids and the blessing you’ve given me with them,” Kennedy prayed. “We believe in the game, we believe in competition and we can come into it as rivals and leave as brothers.”

Story is here.

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